A?new camera ordinance for businesses in Madison has a March 2018 deadline for compliance by existing business owners. In addition to cameras, signage such as this above is required.
A?new camera ordinance for businesses in Madison has a March 2018 deadline for compliance by existing business owners. In addition to cameras, signage such as this above is required.
MADISON — Local installers have seen marked interest in security cameras as the deadline draws near on a city ordinance that will require most businesses to have security cameras at their establishments.

Pro-Tech Security Incorporated and the Alarm Company, both located in Madison County, reported orders and inquiries connected to the ordinance, although both said it did not “drastically” affect their work loads.

“I expected a lot more, honestly,” Ryan Cumbest, owner of Pro-Tech, said.

He said that his building is not covered by the ordinance, but they do have cameras that cover the premises. He said that keeping doors and parking lots monitored will be a good thing.

“I think more cameras in public areas is a great thing. We know they make places safer and business owners have a responsibility to keep themselves and their customers safe,” Cumbest said.

Master Sergeant Jamie Brooks with the Madison Police Department said that, as the March 4 deadline draws closer, they have received calls from business owners to make sure they are compliant.

“Most calls we have received, at least the ones I’ve taken, have been about which cameras to get and stuff like that. I don’t know that we have had any pushback,” Brooks said.

The deadline for local businesses to install security cameras per the city ordinance comes in March.

The ordinance, dubbed the City of Madison Parking Lot and Building Security Ordinance, requires businesses with more than 25 parking spaces or 2,000 square feet to install security cameras that cover the parking lots, entrances and exits for each business. The ordinance is being handled by the Madison Police Department and the city’s permit office.

Noncompliance is punishable by a fine up to $500 and each day of non compliance constitutes a separate violation.

The ordinance was passed last December and went into effect on Jan. 17. All new businesses will be made compliant within their application process through the permits office. Existing businesses have until March 4 to meet the ordinance’s requirements.

The ordinance cites a U.S. Department of Justice study that finds there is “a reduced level of fear amongst people who are aware they are under video surveillance” and that the presence of cameras makes potential offenders second-guess their actions and aids in investigations after an incident has taken place.

“I think this is going to be great for everybody from business owners and the city to shoppers in our stores,” Brooks said.

The ordinance includes a requirement that businesses erect a sign that reads “This outdoor area is being monitored by surveillance cameras by order of the City of Madison and an criminal acts committed herein will be punished to the fullest extent of the law.”