Officials break champagne bottles to celebrate a new $50 million development in Madison. Pictured are: Justin Suber, Madison the City Chamber of Commerce President; partner Dr. Michael Manning; Mayor Mary Hawkins Butler; partner Lee Stafford and partner Mark Castleberry.
Officials break champagne bottles to celebrate a new $50 million development in Madison. Pictured are: Justin Suber, Madison the City Chamber of Commerce President; partner Dr. Michael Manning; Mayor Mary Hawkins Butler; partner Lee Stafford and partner Mark Castleberry.
Dozens of civic and business leaders gathered last week to celebrate the start of construction on the Village at Madison brining a new downtown residential and commercial focus.

Madison Mayor Mary Hawkins Butler welcomed guests to the ceremony, held Friday morning next to the construction site on Madison Avenue near the offices of the Madison Chamber of Commerce.

“The Village at Madison is a key component of our historic district, which we are working to develop into the cornerstone of our city,” Butler told the crowd to big applause.

The development, which will be located adjacent to the Madison Justice Complex, will have entrances from Main Street and Crawford Street. 

The 18-acre district will include approximately 60,000 square feet of commercial space, with Half Shell Oyster House already committing as a tenant. The residential section will encompass 37 homes and nine townhomes.

Main Street Investors, a group comprised of partners Dr. Michael Manning of Ridgeland, Lee Stafford of West Point and Mark Castleberry of Starkville, are the developers behind the project.

“We are a business,” Castleberry said. “When we are choosing a location, we look at the average income and livability… and think ‘What will this community be like five or 10 years from now?’ 

“What we see in Madison is a city that is enjoying growth. It’s the kind of community that we want to be a part of.”



The developers aren’t the only interested party with skin in the game — the city of Madison has approved a TIF, or tax increment financing, of up to $2 million for the project and the Madison County Board of Supervisors last month agreed to a proposed $500,000 TIF.

Hawkins-Butler also announced at the event that the city had recently agreed to purchase the nearby Montgomery House, a picturesque one-story Gothic Revival house built in 1852. 

“I’ve always said that every city needs to have green space near the center of town,” she said. “This is going to be ours.”

Castleberry said he expects the entire buildout of the development to be complete within three years, but that the residential lots should be ready for construction by April 2020 and the Half Shell could be open as early as May or June.